Bossa Nova: Music of Modern Love - Page 7

Reaching back to the 1960s to the cool, sultry sound that riveted Brazil and seduced the world

album cover

17 Bud Shank: Bossa Nova Years (Ubatuqui - 1962-65) This is as irrefutable evidence as you'll get of how bossa can swing, and the proof is applied to both bossa familiars and to standards from the jazz book, including 'If I Should Lose You.' Bud's alto is prettily partnered by Joe Pass and a bossa rhythm section, including João Donato.


album cover

18 Cannonball Adderley: Cannonball's Bossa Nova (Capitol - 1962) No surprise that saxist Adderley, with brother Nat alongside and members of Sérgio Mendes's band, sneaks up 'Corcovado' in a sassy, brassy manner, in which he also approaches other parts of the bossa repertoire. His 'Groovy Sambas' seem to export 'Harlem Nocturne' to Ipanema.


album cover

19 Quarteto Jobim-Morelenbaum: self-titled (Velas/Caravelas - 2000) Tom Jobim's son and grandson carry the genetic material of bossa into the new millennium, along with cellist Jacques Morelenbaum and his wife, Paula, who seems to be channeling the voice of Astrud Gilberto. They refresh the bossa canon, with an almost chamber-music sheen.


album cover

20 Bossacucanova: Uma Batida Differente (Six Degrees - 2004) For the most recent recording among our picks, a group of new, young bossa exponents are joined by veterans Roberto Menescal, Marcos Valle, and Orlann Divo, as well as second-generation star Wilson Simoninha. The updating involves techno and other electronic effects, as well as rootsy Afro accents.