With little notice and zero fanfare, a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed space disappeared from Midtown Manhattan late last month, and architecture fans are only just now taking notice, thanks to an article in Crain’s New York Business.

Plans available from Heidi Richardson, who once worked for Sea Ranch designer William Turnbull, promise a modest but stylish cottage for vacationing or rural living.

The last home Joe Eichler lived in, designed to his specifications by Claude Oakland, is up for sale in Hillsborough. If you have $3.995 million to spare, it could be yours.

In our bi-weekly dose of Eichler humor, the inimitable cartoonist Brian Narelle holds forth on one of the drawbacks to those big windows here in earthquake country.

The one-time disciple of Frank Lloyd Wright forged a design philosophy that valued low-footprint building and resource conservation, an antithesis to Wright's Broadacre plan and Eichler's suburban sprawl.

Two Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes languish on the market in Marin and Contra Costa counties. Their prices have been slashed but even in this hot real estate market nobody's biting. That's because buying a Frank Lloyd Wright means buying into an unending project.

A remodel featured in the Palo Alto Weekly provides a great example of how one can amplify the built-in elements of an Eichler, such as the indoor-outdoor feel, to make it even more Eichler-like.

The San Francisco Museum of Craft and Design announced more than a year ago that it had found a permanent home in the American Industrial Center, a former can factory that still looms on Third Street in Dogpatch. But it's taken a while to complete the move. Finally, though, the museum has a hard opening date.

While researching a story on home tiki bars, people kept talking about their happy childhood tiki memories. But as the grand tiki palaces of yore fade away, where can you take a kid to tiki today?

A serious Eichler fan never roughs it.