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French doors

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Joined: Aug 5 2007

My archtect is recomending french doors out to the patio, and I was wondering if it would go with the eichler.
Will french door in a eichler affect its value?

Thanks

Ronaldo
San Rafael
415-328-3773

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Joined: Apr 19 2007

i'd suggest a new architect.

from your posts, it seems like you're undergoing a major remodel and thinking about taking (or have already taken) out much of what makes and eichler an eichler (paneling, heating, etc.)...

you might want to pause and think about what you want to do with your property and why you moved there... and how you can best preserve your home as well as your investment. if there's one common thread here or on other boards, it's about spoiling the ethos of the home.

the process/analogy is not too different from restoring a vintage car -- doing anything non-stock will greatly effect the value (unless you're chip foose). granted if the stock part was already gone, you might have an excuse to go after-market, but then again, searching the scrapyards is not a bad idea either or "faking it" with modern equivalents. and with the chip foose analogy... if you're going to mess with an architect-designed home, you might want to find a modern architect who understands the above mentioned ethos (and hopefully the resale market) -- which (with the french door idea) it doesn't sound like you've found yet.

but if you're DIYing it... if you are going to replace things (which is often necessary), i'd suggest getting into the mindset of the original architect when looking at things like flooring, windows, etc... and the answer of vinyl- v. aluminum-clad windows becomes clear. there are modern materials out there (and ways to use them) that will work with the home... and sadly, those that will work against it.

granted, it is -- of course -- your house...

Joined: Aug 6 2006

The term "french door" has become a generic term that encompasses all styles of doors that contains large glazing (glass). I think that as long as the door itself is simple (no moulding, no intermediate mullions, etc.) and you use matching modern hardware then I think that it is fine. My rule of thumb is to keep it as simple-looking as possible.

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage-to move in the opposite direction."-E. F. Schumacher.

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Joined: Mar 25 2003

In our neighborhood, the houses that are either original or original looking go for a premium over ones that have been "upgraded". It seems that modern house fans don't want to pay to undo someone elses handy work.

Stick with low profile aluminum windows and doors, flat solid core front and bathroom door, modern light fixtures, mailbox, etc. and you'll do alright in resale. Make it into a regular ranch, tuscan, mission, french country, or McMansion, Victorian, bungalow style mish-mash and suffer the consequences.

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Joined: Feb 8 2005

Ask your architect if he thinks the house would look more dramatic with corinthian columns place at the front door.

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Joined: Apr 19 2007

dommi99 wrote:
Ask your architect if he thinks the house would look more dramatic with corinthian columns place at the front door.

marble columns...(link)

Joined: Aug 6 2006

"ya gotta git yoh self some Mah-ble Coh-lumns..." haha!
Happy Thanksgiving Eichler people!

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage-to move in the opposite direction."-E. F. Schumacher.

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Joined: Mar 20 2003

ronaldo,

sounds like you don't like Eichlers. Really, hardwood floors, vinyl windows, french doors. what are you doing to your house?

Please, do me a favor. pick up a book on Eichlers and learn to appreciate them a little more for what they are. Later on, when you sell your home, buyers will reward you for staying true to the Eichler spirit and original details.

Tell your architect to do the same.

Joined: Aug 6 2006

That doesn't mean he doesn't like Eichlers. For example...if you look all over the Eichlernetwork outside of the chatterbox lounge...you will see many examples of non-purist remodels to Eichlers that still look tasteful (but maybe not to you). Look through the eichlerholic archives and you'll even see (shock!) wood floors and even (shock!) carpet. Look through the listed vendors....I'll bet that there are a few that you'd probably disagree with being on this site. I don't agree with some of these as well but there they are. Face it: Not everyone will treat their house like a classic car so all that you can do is give them suggestions )and not berrate them at the same time.)

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage-to move in the opposite direction."-E. F. Schumacher.

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Joined: Mar 25 2003

Surfer Architect makes some good points. It makes sense to try to educate people about the choices they have. After all, tastes are learned. I got into modernism through Frank Lloyd Wright and Art Deco, but wouldn't dream of tarting up my Eichler as an arts and crafts bungalow or a streamlined machine for living since it would go against the nature of the house. Learning is a process and some folks need a little push to make the effort.

Letting people off the hook for bastardizing a well thought out piece of design is a little like saying it's okay for someone to draw a new smile on the Mona Lisa because they think it looks better. Sure, Eichlers are "just" houses, but some very talented professionals put a lot of thought and effort into them. They represent the very best design available at a certain moment in our history. Many of their concepts (like open floor plans and indoor/outdoor living) are built into new houses today. Eichlers can easily be updated in context.

Eichlers also represent something rare: good modern design for the masses. Most modern houses are one-off designs for a specific well-heeled client. New mass-produced houses all seem to be simulated designs of another time and another place. In the best spirit of American innovation and Valley entrepreneurism, Eichler went against the grain, built to his vision and was successful. Eichlers are authentic. They are part of the Bay Area's collected history. If they keep getting changed into something else, we all lose a little bit.

While my sentiments may seem like they run contrary to the individual rights arguments typically made in these types of threads, it remains true that if someone wants to deEichlerize an Eichler, they could (and should) chose to buy something else. There are plenty of non-Eichlers around already, we don't need more at the expense of fewer Eichlers for the rest of us to exercise our right to spend $800k plus on something we like just the way it is.

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Joined: Jan 16 2004

I think one of the Cool things about this board is the different styles and tastes.
Joe is a Purist that knows a Ton about Mid Century
Tom, your house is killer
Surfer lives in my neighborhood and from the outside is doing a killer job rehabing THE WORST HOME in Rancho San Miguel PERIOD.

Its cool when we can all chime in without being to harsh.

Ronaldo - look into the history of these homes and make the right decision for you and your family. I think you will see that Simple Cabinets with 50's classic hardware and low pro Aluminum windows will go well with what you want from your home.
Please don't rip it apart and make a mockery of the design - you will regret it

Our home was transformed not too badly by the previous owner and we never had radiant heat or Mahogany paneling but we do have a very simple clean kitchen and original large windows with Blomberg windows through the bedrooms and baths. We have made the home ours with classic eames and nelson pieces and a bunch of dwr stuff but also wouldn't trade our Air Conditioning and Forced Heat for the world - Never Ever

Its your home Ronaldo - have fun with it but please as Joe said pick up an Eichler book and do your research first.
Happy New Year
Gerald

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Joined: Mar 20 2003

gturetzky wrote:
I think one of the Cool things about this board is the different styles and tastes.
Joe is a Purist that knows a Ton about Mid Century

haha

so true.

just checking in on you Eichlerites :wink:

actually early A+A Eichlers had french doors, but I doubt yours is that early. I have french doors in my Cliff May. I like them, but I have a tighter module that most Eichlers. With the larger expanses of glass, I feel french doors would clutter up the visual, unlike a slider.

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Joined: Apr 10 2003

The attraction of 'French' doors.
Ya can't open em and have a screen on the door unless you put on a screen door or draw your drapes or vert/hor blinds/wdw coverings over them when they are open. Sliding glass doors offer the the benefits of ventilation with a screen and privacy. I can understand them on a Cliff May as they look appropriate but usually there are other windows in a room to provide ventilation and most of them have walled gardens for privacy. Do they make such a thing as a french door with a sgl/dbl hung slider window in it but even them it seems there's a problem with window coverings.
Like other commenters I say think carefully about what you want.
Frankly I've never seen the need to switch em out but of course others follow the HD and HGTV crowd and say you must put em on because it denotes class and prestige after all it's FRENCH!!!! (yeah right)

Wishing for modern home.

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