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Removing Paint from Interior Chimney

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cpw
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Joined: May 19 2003

Has anyone tried to remove paint from the interior side of the chimney? I wonder how the brick would hold up to sandblasting, and whether, given the rough nature of the brick, you can never really get the paint out of the cracks.

Thanks,

cpw

Chuck (West San Jose)

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Joined: Apr 2 2003

Yes, I've tried to remove paint interior two fireplaces with poor results. My advice would be to start with the method of least effort and move up if that doesn't work. I recommend testing in an inconspicuous place if possible until you know the results.

Some possible methods:

- heat stripping using a heat gun (not a blowtorch).
- chemical stripping (these include 3M Safest Stripper, Jasco or similar serious stipper, PeelAway whichever number recommended for masonry. There is also a new product which might handle masonry called Removall . It is non-toxic and supposed to be very effective. Since it's out of Canada, you'd like have to mailorder from a U.S. distributor.

I would not recommend sandblasting. First of all, it's hard to find anyone that's actually accomplished at this (most seem to sandblast cement swimming pools--an entirely different kind of project). Secondly, there's no easy way to test this method in advance to see how successful it is likely to be--usually you have to commit and they set up all the gear and then you get a sample area done. Finally, sandblasting, even with a lot of attention to sealing off the room, doesn't prevent significant amounts of fine sand dust from settling *everywhere*.

In hind sight, if I was to sandblast again, I would know to first remove as much paint as possible by heat or chemical stripping. We had latext paint and it was pretty much like trying to puncture a balloon casng without penetrating the balloon. The result was that whenever the sand particles punctured the rubbery paint, it immediately gouged the brick below.

Other options: have the fireplace faux painted or reface the fireplace with thin brick veneer (assuming your brick is flat and not "recycled" as mine was). As a final option, you could frame and drywall in the fireplace then simply paint it or texture it in a classically modern style.

Good luck.
jake

eichfan at rawbw dot com

cpw
Offline
Joined: May 19 2003

Thanks Jake. I didn't think sandblasting would be a good option. I have a good heat gun so I might try that.

I never heard from you concerning the garage doors with the Eichler-like paneling. I sent an email. Did you get it?

Chuck

Chuck (West San Jose)

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