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Replacement Window Advise

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Joined: Jul 8 2004

Its almost winter time again and the house seems to have a steady breeze. I'm considering just changing only the windows in the bedrooms. Has anyone done this and was there a noticeable difference in heat retention (either percieved or reduction in heating costs)?

Or should I simply bite the bullet and do the whole house? Can anyone share roughly it would cost to replace all the windows to double pane?

I live in a 2K sqft flat roof, atrium model in Sunnyvale.

Thanks.
BK

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Joined: Mar 9 2004

I replaced about 20 windows(including 1 patio door) by DIY and yes definately, replacing 50 years old window to new doublepane window, makes huge diffrence in terms of enegy saving and heat retention.

I ordered the retrofit window at HomeDepot starting with 2 windows, then 4 windows. as I got the confidence to do this works, I ordered all rest of windows and patio door and installed.

It costs about $6500 for material alone, probably, it would be more than $12000 if I hired a contractor. for the skill level, it is about medium level job, not that difficult.

retrofit window means taking out the sliding window while leaving the window frame in the wall and install new window covering the existing frame. after the installation, nice look, save $$, warm in winter, cool in summer.

Good luck !

Have a Good Day !

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Joined: Oct 12 2004

Hi,

We just installed two double paned windows in the two guest bedrooms. We installed them ourselves. We went with Milgard Aluminum windows. They were quite affordable, and they look similar to the original. (Each window was about $300)

As for your question- I think they made a difference in the rooms' temperatures, which was why we changed them. It is not scientific, but the rooms do feel warmer.

Hope this helps!

Helen

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Joined: Aug 28 2003

Are the Milgard windows made with low-e glass which is able to block UV rays?

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Joined: Oct 12 2004

Yup! The windows do have a low E rating.

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Joined: Mar 22 2003

We replaced all of our windows and sliders - except the two very large panes of glass in the LR and MBR with Milgard double panes with LowE glass. They made a huge difference in heat retention (or cool retention in the summer) and also in noise. But what made the most difference for us, was replacing our tar and gravel roof with a foam one. We noticed a dramatic and immediate difference - especially in the summer, when the house would be in the 80's inside, while the outside was only in the 70's. I would peg the difference at about 10 degrees.

We have been very happy with the performance of the Milgards - they are a great product. My only regret is that we did not know about the Blomberg style doors and windows (with thin Al frames) that would have looked so much like the originals. The Milgards have white vinyl frames (which is better than Al for insulation) and while they look nice and modern, they do change the appearance a bit, because they are thicker than the originals. Also keep in mind that when you go double pane and LowE, the glass has a slight tint to it which takes away from the windowless feeling that one gets when you stand in an Eichler with the original glass that has just been cleaned.

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Joined: Oct 12 2004

Our Milgard windows are silver in color, which is what the orginal windows looked like. Silver is a standard Milgard color, although one has to specify that color. The place we bought our windows were surprised when I asked for silver, but the color is availabe, and it costs the same.

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Joined: Mar 20 2003

Do you have the model numbers/names of the windows mentioned above?

/Gloria

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Joined: Dec 20 2004

Hi Helen,

I also had the Milgard Aluminum windows installed. I did notice the noise reduction but this winter the window FRAMES are condensing a lot (Like taking a soda can out of the fridge) and are cold to the touch. In the window model I have the frames are not insulated from the outside. I guess I have the standard window and I should have gotten the thermally improve version.

Could you let me know what model widow you have and who you got them from? Or let me know what you did about the frame condensing.

Thanks,

-- Ralph

PS I installed Panasonic Wisperwarm bathroom fans. They work great and moisture is not a problem in the house.

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Joined: Jul 8 2003

Hi Ralph,

Panasonic WhisperWarm fan is ceiling mounted, so I guess you need to cut through the roof. What kind of roof do you have (Tar & Gravel or foam)? Were you replacing the roof at the same time, or did you cut the roof just for the fan? If it is the later case, would you share how much it cost you to cut a hole on the roof and install the fan?

I'm remodeling our master bathroom and want to have a fan. I'm still considering ceiling mounted vs wall mounted . We have tar & gravel roof and we are not replacing the roof. If you prefer, you could send info to my email JIONGCHEN AT YAHOO DOT COM. Thanks.

Jiong

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Joined: Oct 12 2004

Hi,

We installed the basic Milgard windows. Really, they were the totally basic model.

They have low-E ratings- not sure of the specs- and are double paned. We bought them from Bruce Bauer Lumber in Mountain View. Really wish I had more info but that is all I know. Hope this helps.

Helen

Ben
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Joined: Aug 12 2004

Jiong,

When we remodeled both of our bathrroms, we put in wall exhaust fans. Don't remember the model/brand/etc, but they are the high end whisper versions at Home Depot. About $79 bucks each.

While the room has the sheetrock removed, it's much easier.

GFI for the sink outlet and then run a GFI protected (secondary) to the fan switch, which is dial timer or on/off (dependes which way to turn the dial).

Tough for a wall with a beam along gthe top, but we solved that with an iron plate welded to brace the hole cut into the beam. Had a civil engineer do the calculations for the bracket and I welded it up (cut the hole for the exhaust and drilled the bolting holes).

The master bath has this beam on that outside wall. We also had that whole section along the tub/shower opened up with glass blocks and a bathroom rated window. Code says every room has to have two exits and this window is #2 exit. Min size too, as it's supposed to allow the "average" to above "average" bodied person to crawl out of that thing.

Works well and moisture is no longer a problem. Plus had additional anti-fungus treatment added to the primer and paint, which already came with the stuff. Just added more. That little tube costs about $5 bucks and treats 5 gallons.

Turn on the fan, shower or soak in the tub. After finish squeegeeing off tghe surfaces, turn the timer on for 30min, some times 1 hour. Since GFI protected, okay when still soaking wet from the shower to touch and work that switch while standing on the floor tiles.

I've installed sky lights and found that the builders didn't have very good control over their sub-contractors. One skylight had an electrical conduit line smack in the way and for no good reason either, they just didn't want to cut the conduit and just bent it to fit. Caused much headach after I cut through that conduit. So don't really like to cut into these roofs if possible.

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Joined: Dec 20 2004

Hi Jiong,

> What kind of roof do you have (Tar & Gravel or foam)?

Foam

> Were you replacing the roof at the same time, or did you cut the roof just for the fan?

I was doing resurfacing, installing two fans, opening the atrium back up (it was roofed over), installing a new electrical pannel and kitchen subpannel.

> If it is the later case, would you share how much it cost you to cut a hole on the roof and install the fan?

I'm not sure how much it cost because I had several jobs done together and could wait for the scheduling, so I got a bit of a discount. The roofing included partial refoaming and resealing so again I got a combined price.

Also see the thread on Fan installation. There was some good details there. Basically you need a carpenter to cut the hole and make the box for on top of the roof, an electrician to run new power from the panel, new switch and wire it up and a roofer to seal (I guess in your case hotmop) the box and other sheet metal parts (hood jack and cap.) I recommend doing this during the summer and have some plastic on hand. It is hard to put these schedules together and you could have a hole in the roof for a week or more.

Please ask someone else to estimate the cost. renmancon@rcn.com would be a better person to ask. I was very happy with his work and he fixed anything that was not correct or to my liking.

My only problem now is these dual pane (or is that pain :-) windows. Why did I go throught the pain of getting them installed if they condense so much?

I called the Window Sales person and have emailed Milgard. I'll let you know what happens...

Regards,

-- Ralph

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Joined: Mar 31 2003

Hey, new windows would be great, but there is another option.

Why not caulk the windows so that no air goes around the sides and add cellular shades? They pull up to nothing when open, and give a great deal of insulation when down, especially the double or triple cell duette versions. Costs are much more reasonable than replacing glass...

Just a thought.

John Dark

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Joined: Dec 20 2004

The Milguard Service guy did come by and some of my Windows were not 100% sealed at the corners. Sealing did help a little but not a lot. He gave me a brochure on condensation which duh explained that if you have a lot of moisture in the air it would condense on the window.

Any I like the windows but I think next time I would have gotten Aluminum color and a thermally insulated type window.

Maybe I'll replace one and see if there is a difference. I'm not sure I'm up to tearing one out because they look nice on the outside too.

My other though is to put in a gas insert with a fan in the fireplace and this will dry the air out a little more. ( I already vent the house when the weather is nice.)

-- Ralph

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Joined: Dec 6 2004

I have a basic question: when replacing original windows does anyone who has done this recommend replacing them either from the inside or outside, i.e. which is the preferred way to go? It appears that replacing the windows from the exterior is easiest, but before I embark I'd welcome any feedback. I also found a great alternative to Milgard and Blomberg. There's a company in Belmont that makes low e replacement windows, double paned, aluminum, for about $200 per window (30 by 36).

David

David Smethurst

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Joined: Jul 8 2003

dsmethur wrote:
There's a company in Belmont that makes low e replacement windows, double paned, aluminum, for about $200 per window (30 by 36).

David

David,

Would you care to share info on the window company? I'm about to replace the two guest bedroom windows and the two bathroom windows. You can send email to JIONG CHEN AT YAHOO DOT COM. Thanks in advance.

Jiong

Ben
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Joined: Aug 12 2004

dsmethur wrote:
I have a basic question: when replacing original windows does anyone who has done this recommend replacing them either from the inside or outside, i.e. which is the preferred way to go? It appears that replacing the windows from the exterior is easiest, but before I embark I'd welcome any feedback. I also found a great alternative to Milgard and Blomberg. There's a company in Belmont that makes low e replacement windows, double paned, aluminum, for about $200 per window (30 by 36).

David

Tough replacing them from the inside, as the sequence of the over lap very important.

Think of roofing shingles. the bottom should be the first, so that the next row will have the water run onto the "TOP", then the next layer, etc.

Then the window flanges are larger than the "hole" in the wall. It will have to pass through a smaller hole to get from the inside to the outside.

Guess replacing the window from the inside can be done, but I'd not want to try.

Then the various layers of sealing materials must be layered in proper sequence in order for them to seal and redirect water away from the wall.

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Joined: Oct 7 2004

Same here,
may I get the info on that Belmont business?

thanks

email: metapalm@yahoo.com

David

dsmethur wrote:
I also found a great alternative to Milgard and Blomberg. There's a company in Belmont that makes low e replacement windows, double paned, aluminum, for about $200 per window (30 by 36).

David

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Joined: Mar 20 2003

I had Milgard double panes put in my home about 4 years ago. At the time, I knew that double panes may eventually fail. I bought Milgard partly because of their lifetime warranty. Two months ago, the seal broke (condensation was collecting inside the panes) on my biggest window. I called Milgard and within two minutes they scheduled someone to come and measure the window for replacement. Within a month they replaced the window at no cost. They were very courteous and the company that was contracted to replace them was very good. Just thought I would pass that along for those of you considering Milgard.
/ Lynn in Palo Alto

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Joined: Oct 12 2004

I would love the name of the window company in Belmont, too. We still have more windows to do, so am curiuos about this local company.

Thanks!

helen_silverberg at yahoo dot com

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Joined: Dec 6 2004

I've done a bit of research on window replacement and Eichler's are pretty easy to work on. All of the smaller windows are set in "boxes" held in place by three wooden stoppers, one on either side, one on top. To replace a window, all you need is accurate measurements (measure width and heigh at top, middle and bottom for width, left, middle and right for height, and reduce by 1/4 inch or so, so if you width is 30.5 order a 30.25 inch window). Order windows without a nail fin. Installation is simple using polyurethene caulk. You'll have to trim the stoppers since the new windows are wider, but you can also get new stoppers at a local lumber store and have them cut. I've also found that for do-it-yourselfers you can save more than 50% on the cost of upgrading windows by ordering direct. Even with Blomberg you can order direct and they ship to you, so it's as hard as you would expect.

David Smethurst

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