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Advantage/disadvantage of a Gallery model vs. an Atrium?

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

Everyone-

Just wonding your thoughts on the relative advantages and disadvantages of the gallery model Eichler vs. the atrium model . . . .
-Tim

:)

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Joined: Mar 22 2003

What's a gallery model?

Ours is a courtyard model. You walk in through a front gate and are immediately inside of a totally open, outdoor courtyard. Go straight, and you are at the front door. Go forward and a little to the left, and your can walk into the kitchen/great room through the sliding glass doors.

Down here (San Jose), atrium models seem a bit more common, but we have quite a few courtyards as well. We specifically chose this model in order to get more separation between the house and the street--basically a bigger yard. It fits our lifestyle perfectly, since it gives us two entirely different outdoor spaces, front and back, to use and to enjoy.

Cathye

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

Cathye-

My understanding of the term "gallery" model means an enclosed atrium per orignal design, and not as a home remodel of an existing atrium. There is an example of this type of house in Upper Lucas Valley. Where the atrium would be on a regular atrium model, the house has a roof instead, with a skylight or two to let in light.
-Tim

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Joined: Dec 28 2003

I don't mean to derail the thread topic, but I think this is related: Some plans show an area called "loggia". What is that?

Dan Cogswell
Anshen+Allen E-111 in Castro Valley

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

dancogswell-

Is the Loggia a covered walkway next to the atrium? Very good question - I don't know what it is, either. Maybe someone else can clarify?
-Tim

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

I found the model I'm talking about using the Plan Depot on the Eichlernetwork site - It's the MC34 by Claude Oakland. What are the advantages/disadvantages to this model vs. a regular atrium version? Thanks!
-Tim

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Joined: Dec 28 2003

Dan Cogswell
Anshen+Allen E-111 in Castro Valley

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

That's the one! Thanks, Dancogswell!

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Joined: Dec 28 2003

You're welcome, Tim. I believe there are some period pictures of a house with that floorplan in the Adamson and Arbunich book. I'm separated from the book right now to confirm, though.

Dan Cogswell
Anshen+Allen E-111 in Castro Valley

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

I believe you are right - I have seen those pictures, and I've been to an open-house in Upper Lucas Valley where I was inside the MC34. I'd like to hear from someone who knows about this model, and how it compares to an atrium model, both positive and negative. If anyone out there knows, please post something. Thanks!
-Tim

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Joined: Mar 22 2003

I think Dan's definition of a loggia is correct, though I am no expert. If correct, you can see one in the photo on Page 89 of the Jerry Ditto Eichler book. It is of Sue Olson's Atherton Eichler, originally built by Joe for his son. Extraordinary home that was destroyed by a new owner of the property a few years ago.

What a terrific floorplan in the home posted. I would kill to have those bedrooms that are quite a bit larger than our 10x10's! I guess the main advantage over the atrium is more interior living space. The disadvantage would be loss of the extra light and air that having the "outdoors in" feel in the center of your home would provide. Although I believe, from the homes I have seen, that the galley is designed with a fair amount of glass up above. Correct?

Just my $0.02 from someone who has never lived in an atrium, but has been inside of many, many different Eichlers (not nearly enough, however).

Cathye

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

Cathye-

Hmmm. I wonder if the Gallery Model would change heating costs vs. the atrium model?
-Tim

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Joined: Apr 10 2003

I grew up in a house with an atrium (very much like the plan in the Eichler book) but not an Eichler (home built by Robert Voisen and later by Lewis Homes which was bought by Kaufman and Broad). It used forced air heating system (not radiant) and the big issue would be insulation-what did Eichler put in the exterior walls and ceiling circa 1963-typically a lot of homes built then had minimal insulation-the 4th bedroom at the end of the duct and 3 sides exterior walls we called the north pole room as it was cold a lot of the time in the winter months and the air flow thru the duct was little by the time it reached there. If someone is in love with Eichlers and made the appropriate (and probably expensive) energy saving improvements then which model you choose will probably not make much difference-what will make the difference it what HVAC system/insulation you have and what you can put up with-go into it will full knowledge and you will have no cold surprises on a winter day.

Wishing for modern home.

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Joined: Dec 29 2003

Hmmm. If the house has radiant heat, which would be cheaper to heat, the gallery model or the atrium model?
-Tim

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Joined: Apr 10 2003

The privacy of your living areas-right now there is no window coverings on the sgd's into the atrium (except the Br's-for privacy) there is also the issue of security-you can ask who it is at the gate before letting them into the house-leaving the sgd's open while your away for the day. Right now there is a fountain that gives a calming water gurgling streamy sound-it's really nice. If you have an opportunity to go for an atrium Eichler get it-I especially like the larger atrium model in the Thousand Oaks tract.

Wishing for modern home.

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Joined: Apr 10 2003

Plan VC 694
I grew up in a plan very similar to plan E-71 (there was no hobby/multipurpose room off the garage-but all the rooms are in the same locations but configured differently)

Wishing for modern home.

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Joined: Feb 11 2004

Our Eichler (Fairhills, Orange) is an OC-574 floorplan (http://www.eichlersocal.com/floorplans/FPindex1.htm) with a covered but outdoor entrance that leads to an interior open atrium. If you look at the plan the loggia is the area inside the sliding glass door and running--like a bit of a hallway--between the multipurpose room, along the living room to the hallway to the bedrooms. It is separated--but only minimally so--from the living room by a few columns holding up the roof beams. A loggia is also defined as "An open-sided, roofed or vaulted gallery, either free-standing or along the front or side of a building, often at an upper level."

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Joined: Mar 23 2011

I'm still unclear on what a gallery is. I noticed that the master bedroom, the bedroom wing hallway, and a coat closet directly off the gallery. This indicates that it is entirely enclosed, whereas the atrium is outdoors.

What is the floor material in a gallery? What is the ceiling made of? Does it have places for plants? In other words, does it feel like you're inside or outside?

Dave

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