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Solutions for a cracked sewer line in slab

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Joined: Jun 6 2006

Anyone out there ever fix a leak in their sewer line (within the slab, under the house) without having to dig up concrete and sever radiant heat piping? I've seen solutions online where they slide a sleeve with o-rings into the clean-out but don't know anyone who's done so.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!

Mystermark

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Joined: Aug 30 2003

I cannot imagine that the solution you describe could work. You are going to have to break into the slab and do it properly. I do not think there is any alternative, unfortunately.

1959 A. Quincy Jones atrium model in The Highlands, San Mateo http://www.totheweb.com/eichler

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Joined: Mar 20 2003

Dear Mystermark-

I'm curious as to how you know you have a sewer leak. If there is a radiant heat leak, you see a drop in pressure at the boiler. If there is a domestic water leak, the water meter keeps running (and if it's enough, it shows up on the utility bill). What are the signs that your sewer is leaking?

I have roots grow in my sewer pipe from my house to the street as most of my neighbors do. That pipe is failing and for about $4K, I can have a plumbing company come out and replace it. In the meantime, most of us hire rotorooter every year to clean out the roots that I guess grow through tiny cracks and joints in the pipe. I think that under the house, the pipe is cast iron. It is some other kind of pipe (not cast iron) from the house to the street connection.
Lynn

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Joined: Aug 30 2003

Hi Lynn,

Perhaps when "Mystermark" used the word "leak" he meant "blockage". I agree, it's usually impossible to know if a sewer line is leaking because they are so deep and the leakage would just go into the ground and out of sight.

I had a blocked sewer line a few years ago. The toilet wouldn't flush. Using a video camera on a long line, it was determined that the line was blocked by tree roots within a few feet of my front property line. What a pain that was to fix! I ended up doing it myself because the plumber I hired did not do it to San Mateo County specs even though his quote specifically stated that he would, and I personally provided him with the county specs, in writing. So the county wouldn't sign off on the work he did. It's not a difficult repair, except for the part where you have to dig a 4 ft. deep hole!

Barry

1959 A. Quincy Jones atrium model in The Highlands, San Mateo http://www.totheweb.com/eichler

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Joined: Jun 6 2006

Hi All,

Thanks for the feedback. We knew we had problems with our line after sending a camera down and finding a serious blockage (outside the house) and some large roots penetrating the line (under the house). The fear was that the roots hadn't been cut in years and that there could be extensive damage.

We cut the roots and did a water pressure test on the line. It held so we're looking good.

I just wanted to be prepared with a contingency plan in case we found a high leak rate during the "static" pressure test, figured I'd ask around. Sounds like digging up the floors is the concensus.

- Mystermark

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Joined: Jul 22 2003

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